Design Studies

Philippe Starck


You will be studying two designers - Philippe Starck and Alvar Aalto. You will be asked to analyse in detail one design work by each designer, the images are shown here. To access the detailed notes on each design work you will need a username and password. This can be obtained from your art & design teacher.

The Juicy Salif


"Juicey Salif", lemon squeezer, 1990 - 91, cast Aluminium - manufactured by Alessi. This was Starck's first project for Alessi. The juicey Salif, captured imaginations worldwide. The Lemon squeezer pushed design to new limits and instantly became a cult classic. It can be seen as a piece of sculpture, an organic plant form, a sea creature or a 1950's space sci-fi film prop.

The tapered main body with its sreamlined vertical grooves provide the fresh squeezed juice to flow into the recepticle below. The gathering bowl or other vessel will sit comfortably below the pod shape. If a begger bowl is used the lemon squeezer can be placed with ease inside the bowl. The tall tripod leg arrangement is essential in this function. Although the legs are tall they have strength and stability. Its elegant aerodynamic shape can be easily cleaned as none of the working parts are hidden or obstructed. The feature aids the hygenic maintainance essential when food is being prepared. Overall it performs the same function as traditional lemon squeezers, however with more style and credibility. Its curious appearance, its material finish and, typically Starck, its sense of fun ensure its status as a design classic.

Sir Terence Conran, British design icon, summed up thus: "its intriguing, tactile and desirable and even though it squirts juice over your shirt, its fun to use".

Alvar Aalto


You will be studying two designers - Philippe Starck and Alvar Aalto. You will be asked to analyse in detail one design work by each designer, the images are shown here. To access the detailed notes on each design work you will need a username and password. This can be obtained from your art & design teacher.

Paimio Chair (Chair # 41)


Designed in 1932 for the Paimio Tuberculosis Sanatorium. Seat and back formed from a single piece of plywood - bent and scrolled at each end, suspended on a laminated, solid birch frame.


The Paimio chair is made from laminated birch plywood and is black lacquered. The chair was designed for tuberculosis sufferers, a condition  of the lungs. The colour black attracts sunlight and heat which was beneficial to the health of the tuberculosis sufferers.  


The Paimio chair is very organic in shape. The seat and back are constructed from the same piece of wood, which ends in curves at either end creating its wave and ‘ribbonlike’ form. This functions as both structure and a decorative element, creating a natural beauty to the product and makes is aesthetically pleasing.